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At the conclusion of the ASGCT meeting, Julianna LeMieux, PhD, GEN’s deputy editor in chief, and Corinna Singleman, PhD, GEN’s managing editor, chat about how they spent their time at the conference and their unique takeaways from the research and news presented through the week.
They discussed general insights on how diverse the topics have been. Julianna discussed David Liu’s, PhD, keynote on Wednesday and Corinna shared about an interview she had with Frederic Revah, PhD, Genethon.

Bye, Bye, Baltimore: GEN’s Takeaways from ASGCT

The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy (ASGCT) meeting is off and running in Baltimore, Maryland. Kevin Davies, PhD, editorial director and Corinna Singleman, PhD, managing editor at GEN are on the ground—in the talks, expo hall, and press room, covering as much of the news as they can. 
Here, they take a moment to chat about the start of the meeting and what they are looking forward to over the next few days. Davies discusses how this year’s conference is different from the meetings five years ago, opening workshops featuring Y. Esther Tak, PhD, Arena Bioworks, Samagya Banskota, PhD, Boston University, Jonathan Levy, PhD, Prime Medicine, Makoto Saito, PhD, Broad Institute, and Cameron Glasscock, PhD, University of Washington. They both share their thoughts on an interview with Mammoth’s CSO Lucas Harrington, and the news about the DAYLIGHT trial. Singleman shares her first impressions of ASGCT as a first-time attendee, some interesting talks during the “Prospects for Prenatal Gene and Cell Therapy” session Tuesday morning, and how things are going in the exhibition hall. 

ASGCT 2024: A Video Update from Baltimore

June 2024 cover

The June issue of GEN doubles your learning opportunities. It has two articles on multiomics (one on emerging technologies; one on clinical applications), and it has two lists of top gene editing therapy companies (one for public companies; one for private companies). The June issue also has two articles on upstream bioprocessing. Both emphasize process intensification technologies that establish pairs: on one side, there is the modeled; on the other, the modeler. (The logical extreme is the digital twin.) Similar pairings of the virtual and the real crop up elsewhere in the issue. For example, there’s an article on AI-assisted drug development that juxtaposes target space with computational space. Also, there’s an editorial about the need to pair AI-derived findings with validating information from wet-lab experiments. Finally, there are articles about proliferating CRISPR gene editing technologies and microbiome therapeutics. Lots of them. (Not everything comes in pairs!)