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Oct 15, 2005 (Vol. 25, No. 18)

GeneWindow

URL:genewindow.nci.nih.gov/
  • Excellent organization of information
  • Needs better layout, design
Hmmmm. Here is an oddity for a government-developed site. The opening page proclaims Genewindow as "the primary tool for pre-and post-genetic bioinformatics and analytical work at the Core Genotyping Facility (CGF) at the National Cancer Institute." Good enough. Then, a couple of hallmarks of poor design— #1: onsite advice proclaiming "be sure allow pop-ups and not block them from this site" (Acch—Danger Will Robinson!); and #2: a QuickTime demo showing Genewindow "in action". This little yawner is a several minute long video of someone scrolling through a Genewindow window. I was almost ready to bypass this seeming turkey, when I did a little playing around and discovered a powerful organization of information underlying the sequences and gene maps. Once I got used to it, it provided one of the tidier compilations of sequences and annotations I have seen. First impressions aren't always correct.
  • Key:
  • Strong Points
  • Weak Points
  • Ratings:
  • Excellent
  • Very Good
  • Good


*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

Do you agree that ecstasy should be studied for its potential therapeutic benefits?

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