The story of Phineas Gage illustrates some of the first medical knowledge gained on the relationship between personality and the functioning of the brain's frontal lobe. A construction foreman from Vermont, Gage survived an accident while laying railroad tracks, during which a 13-pound tamping iron blew straight through his head. Gage’s skull, along with the tamping iron that bore through it, are conserved at the Warren Anatomical Museum, which is a part of the Center for the History of Medicine in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine at Harvard. 

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