Neutralizing Antibodies Making Their Mark in Next Wave of Biologics

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In the last couple of years, there has been heightened interest in the development of Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as therapeutics as they have shown great promise in the treatment of serious or untreatable conditions such as cancer. This is partly due to their highly specific targeting of antigens as well as their high efficacy and fewer side effects. Vaccines and effective antibody therapeutics will play an integral role in keeping the on-going COVID-19 pandemic and emerging variants under control. Neutralizing Antibodies are an example of molecules that will play a critical role in vaccine and therapeutics development as they can bind to a virus in a manner that blocks infection. Neutralizing Antibodies can be isolated from plasma of convalescent patients and have become a major focus for researchers around the globe in the race to a better understanding of the mechanisms of action (MOA) against the receptor-binding domains (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein.

In this collection we highlight the research efforts and related applications utilized to study binding affinity, potency and target specificities of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and their potential for future use against diseases caused by viruses from the same coronavirus subgroup. The novel findings provide deeper insights into the immune responses to infection, and help further the understanding of the interactions between the spike protein on the SARS-CoV-2 virus and its receptor on host cells. The interruption of this interaction has become the key target of COVID-19 therapeutics.

Sartorius continues to support these early stage investigations by providing innovative Incucyte® live-cell analysis and iQue® advanced flow cytometry and Octet® label-free biomolecular interactions analysis platforms to provide new critical information, with confidence, as quickly as possible.

 

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