People who recently experienced severe weather events such as floods, storms, and drought are more likely to support policies to adapt to the effects of climate change, according to a new study published in Global Environmental Change, co-authored by Indiana University researcher David Konisky, Ph.D. But the relationship between exposure to extreme weather and support for climate policies is small, the study finds. And it fades quickly; a month after an extreme weather event, there was no effect.

Dr. Konisky said the effect of experiencing extreme weather pales next to other factors that influence attitudes toward climate policies, such as one's political beliefs and party affiliation

Poll Question:
People who recently experienced severe weather events such as floods, storms, and drought are more likely to support policies to adapt to the effects of climate change. But the relationship between exposure to extreme weather and support for climate policies is small and it fades quickly; a month after an extreme weather event, there was no effect.

Do you think that frequent and extreme weather events in the future will change the minds of even the most intractable global warming deniers?

Yes
94

No
158