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Aug 20, 2013

Johns Hopkins Heads GEN List of the Top 50 NIH-Funded Universities

  • New Rochelle, NY, August 20, 2013—Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News reports that Johns Hopkins University ranked first on the “GEN List of the Top 50 NIH-Funded Universities” for fiscal year 2013. The venerable Baltimore-based institution received $418,940,258. Coming in second was the University of California-San Francisco with $339,936,379 in NIH funding, according to GEN.

    “NIH funding is critical for advancing basic research at universities and medical schools,” says John Sterling, editor in chief of GEN. “Yet, due to sequestration, NIH needs to cut $1.55 billion from its fiscal year 2013 budget and this will definitely have a major impact on every area of biomedical research.”

    The number 3, 4, and 5 positions on the GEN list were filled by the University of Washington, $336,840,040; University of Pennsylvania, $334,469,587; and University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, $306,481,422.

    This year's list has been expanded from last year's edition of the NIH list, which ranked the top 25 institutions. The expanded list makes evident several observations. One is the dominance of California institutions, driven by the success in winning NIH grants enjoyed by some of the largest schools in the University of California system. In all, six UC schools appear on this year's list—UC San Francisco, UC San Diego, and UCLA, which all made the top 10; followed further down by UC Davis, UC Irvine, and UC Berkeley. Among the Golden State's private institutions, Stanford University and University of Southern California (USC) placed in the list's top half. Second-best state for winning NIH funds is Massachusetts.

    To see the entire GEN List of the Top 50 NIH-Funded Universities, please go here.



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