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GEN News Highlights : May 27, 2009

Anacor Partners with TB Alliance and Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative

Firm will apply boron technology to identify drug candidates.

Anacor Pharmaceuticals is reporting separate deals with the Global Alliance for TB Drug Development and Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) that leverage its boron platform.

Anacor is providing the TB Alliance with a nonexclusive, royalty-free worldwide license for TB. Both organizations will explore an antibacterial drug target with Anacor receiving support from the TB Alliance for its research efforts.

The company also extended its license and drug development agreement with DNDi to develop therapeutics for African sleeping sickness, visceral leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease. Over the last 12 months, the partnership has moved from hit to lead series, according to Shing Chang, R&D director of DNDi. The terms of the arrangement give DNDi a nonexclusive, royalty-free license for any boron-based compound identified through the collaboration for neglected diseases for developing countries.

Anacor’s other partners include GSK and Schering Plough. Its relationship with GSK involves development of systemic anti-infectives and is in the preclinical stage with four compounds.

The drug partnered with Schering is also Anacor’s lead candidate. It is in Phase II studies as a treatment for onychomycosis. Other candidates being developed alone include a Phase II topical product for skin and nail infections, anti-inflammatories in Phase I and II development for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, and compounds in early clinical studies for periodontal disease and acne.




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