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GEN News Highlights : Jun 11, 2014

ASHG, JAX Launch Clinical Genetic Education Collaboration

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) and The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) said today they have launched a new collaboration to produce and deliver educational programs designed to integrate genetic and genomic advances into clinical healthcare practice.

The programs will educate groups such as students and trainees, primary care and other physicians, nurses, pharmacists, physician assistants, and social workers, both organizations said.

ASHG and JAX will build upon more than a half century of joint educational efforts. For more than 50 years, ASHG members and JAX faculty have jointly organized and taught the annual two-week “Short Course on Medical and Experimental Mammalian Genetics,” conducted at JAX’ main campus in Bar Harbor, ME.

The new effort is intended to allow JAX and ASHG to further coordinate their educational activities by developing complementary programs while avoiding duplication.

The first joint ASHG-JAX educational program is scheduled for November, and will educate primary care physicians on cancer genetic testing. The program will take place at the new Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine in Farmington, CT.

“The faculty and members of our two organizations are the individuals conducting the latest research into genetics and human health and disease. This collaboration will allow us to combine their areas of expertise and reach larger audiences than ever before,” Joseph D. McInerney, ASHG’s evp, said in a statement.

McInerney and Edison Liu, M.D., JAX’ president and CEO, led executives from both organizations in signing a Memorandum of Understanding to launch their collaboration.

Added JAX trustee and ASHG past president David Valle, M.D., the Henry J. Knott Professor and Director of the Institute of Genetic Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine: “This is an exciting and vital educational partnership to advance the integration of genetics and genomics into medicine at this critical time.”