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Use of Genetically Modified Alfalfa Unnecessarily Held Hostage

3 Readers' Comments

Posted by: farm smart

03/07/2010

Please! Try to inform yourself on the parameters of gm alfalfa before attacking it.It has nothing to do with anything but regulating weeds as part of a crop rotation in a more economical approach.Not everyone can grow crops in a high moisture environment to meet their nutrient requirements.Alfalfa is a self limiting crop by nature and has limited susceptibility to glyphos already.It will be controlled in its gm state as well by current methods2 4 d/dicamba etc.Read the usda report if you have enough time on your hands to write un educated innacuracies on the internet!

Posted by: genetically modified crops/Alfalfa

02/15/2010

I agree with Conscious Canadian, and others who not only believe, but KNOW that organic is best...stop messing with nature, and using us as the guinea pigs. I have the right to raise my kids on 'real' foods, not some corporate idea of what we should be fed. Have you seen Food, Inc.? Prepare for a revolution. We're tired of corporations running the show, the farms and our ability to purchase natural foods.

Posted by: Crops advisor

02/11/2010

To assume that glyphosate resistant crops are harmless in the environment is short-sighted at best. The industry told us that GMO corn would be safe to use for all purposes. That may be true, but the widespread adaptation of this technology has contaminated even the most diligent efforts to isolate non-GMO fields. The point is, if an end user wants to purchase a commodity free of these genes, he should be able to do so and it may not be possible any more. The same would apply to any glyphosate tolerant crop, even soybeans and alfalfa, which do not spread their pollen so easily as corn.

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