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May 19, 2014

Circulating Tumor Cells Publications Analysis

Find out what topics are hot in the CTC research space.

Circulating Tumor Cells Publications Analysis

The authors analyzed every single CTC publication in the academic databases to understand the classes of cancer where CTCs are studied. [Scientific American]

  • This GEN report presents a snapshot of the market landscape for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) based on our continuing industry tracking of this space, focusing here on the publications landscape thereby providing insight into the trends operative from a macro perspective.

    Highlights of this report:

    • Given the huge interest in CTCs as a means for enabling liquid biopsies, we’ve analyzed the en bloc publications landscape of the CTCs space.
    • We analyzed every single CTC publication in the academic databases as a means to understand the classes of cancer where CTCs are studied as well as the molecular marker(s) being studied in the context of each cancer class.
    • Here we present for the first time a complete picture of which molecular elements (markers) are being studied in the context of various cancer classes in the CTC space.
      • Every single publication from a total of >16,000 was analyzed and “classified” into distinct subclasses
      • The data presented here is the first of several reports on this topic where we describe with granularity the research landscape of CTCs, which markers are being studied, which disease classes are being studied, and the technology platform(s) being utilized in these studies.
    • These data are our second report on liquid biopsies, and we seek to frame all the various biomarker classes that together are in the running today for circulating biomarkers of the future.


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