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GEN’s editor in chief, John Sterling, interviews life science academic and biotech industry leaders on important research, technology, and trends. These podcasts will keep you informed with all the important details you need.

Biotechnology and pharmaceutical researchers are increasingly relying on High Throughput Screening (HTS) methods to discover new leads that may ultimately be transformed into novel drugs.


With this in mind, GEN recently held a Current Trends in HTS roundtable at our offices in New Rochelle, NY. We invited four industry scientists to provide their perspectives on the recent state of HTS in bioresearch and to give us their thoughts on where the technology might be headed.


Members of the roundtable included: Dejan Bojanic, Ph.D., Head of Lead Finding Platform, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research; Richard M. Eglen, Ph.D., President, Bio-discovery, PerkinElmer; Stephan Heyse, Ph.D., Head of Lead Discovery Informatics, Genedata; and Berta Strulovici, Ph.D., Vice President Basic Research, Automated Biotechnology Head, Merck Research Laboratories. The moderator was John Sterling, Editor-in-Chief of GEN.


We hope you find the podcast stimulating and that it helps you think of new ways to carry out your own HTS research.

Members of the roundtable included: Dejan Bojanic, Ph.D., Head of Lead Finding Platform, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research; Richard M. Eglen, Ph.D., President, Bio-discovery, PerkinElmer; Stephan Heyse, Ph.D., Head of Lead Discovery Informatics, Genedata; and Berta Strulovici, Ph.D., Vice President Basic Research, Automated Biotechnology Head, Merck Research Laboratories. The moderator was John Sterling, Editor-in-Chief of GEN.



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