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Mar 15, 2010

Tocris and Sigma-Aldrich to Supply Pfizer Molecules for Research Use

  • Tocris Bioscience and Sigma-Aldrich separately entered into agreements to supply a range of Pfizer compounds to the global research community. The companies point out that this marks the first time that Pfizer molecules will be provided for research use.

    Tocris gained rights to sell authentic, fully licensed, nonformulated sunitinib, varenicline, and other Pfizer compounds as off-the shelf products for use in preclinical research studies.  Sunitinib is the active ingredient in anticancer agent Sutent, and varenicline is the API in Chantix, a smoking-addiction therapy. Additionally, Tocris will also offer a significant number of Pfizer's biologically active small molecules that have not progressed from development to clinical use. 

    Sigma-Aldrich will sell approximately 100 Pfizer-developed small molecules to life science researchers for target characterization, assay development, screening, and in vivo animal model applications. Rights include patented and approved drugs such as atorvastatin (a statin), sildenafil (Viagra), and celecoxib (Celebrex for arthritis).

    The molecules will be made available to the research community while still on patent, in some cases for the first time, Sigma-Aldrich points out. They will be sold worldwide directly through Sigma-Aldrich as in-stock, prepackaged items and, upon request, in bulk. Sigma-Aldrich expects to add further molecules on a regular basis.

    The compounds will also be mapped to genes and associated pathways and interactors via Sigma-Aldrich's online search platform, Your Favorite Gene powered by Ingenuity. 

     



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