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Jul 9, 2013

Sorrento Licenses Ben-Gurion University HCV Antibody Clones

  • Sorrento Therapeutics and B.G. Negev Technologies and Applications—the technology transfer company of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev—have entered into an option and license agreement covering several fully human anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody clones discovered in the lab of Leslie Lobel, M.D., Ph.D.

    Under the terms of the agreement, Sorrento will be developing these early findings related to HCV antibody clones into potential therapeutic products. Financial terms were not disclosed.

    "We are pleased to be collaborating with Sorrento to develop our fully human anti-HCV antibody clones into potential anti-HCV therapeutics,” Ben-Gurion’s Dr. Lobel said in a statement.

    Added Sorrento’s Henry Ji, Ph.D., president and CEO: “We are excited to be working with Dr. Lobel to add a program targeting HCV to our existing portfolio of therapeutic antibodies for the prevention and/or treatment of major infectious diseases.” Dr. Ji noted that his firm has “already achieved many successes using its proprietary G-MAB® library to identify, characterize, and develop fully human antibodies against difficult targets relevant to infectious agents.”



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