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Nov 1, 2010

Nycomed Takes Majority Stake in Chinese Pharma Firm Techpool Bio-Pharma

Nycomed Takes Majority Stake in Chinese Pharma Firm Techpool Bio-Pharma

Firm says acquisition will provide springboard for further expansion in Chinese market.[KonstantinosKokkinis-Fotolia.com]

  • Nycomed has acquired a 51.34% majority stake in Chinese pharmaceutical firm Guangdong Techpool Bio-Pharma. The Swiss-based Nycomed says the acquisition will bolster its presence in the Chinese market and expand the commercialization base for its own products. Techpool’s other major shareholder is pharmaceutical conglomerate Shanghai Pharmaceutical Group, which holds 40.8% of Techpool and was previously its majority shareholder.

    Focused on the development of biologics derived from natural sources, Techpool’s marketed products include: a series of protein drugs, including Kailikang® (kallikrein for injection), Techpool Roan® (ulinastatin for injection), and Roxin® (urokinase for injection). The firm also operates a number of production lines that meet EU and FDA regulatory standards to produce lyophilized injections, parenteral injections, and APIs. Techpool has a marketing network covering the entire Chinese nation, and its products are distributed throughout Japan, South Korea, India, and Pakistan. The firm’s IP portfolio includes 17 granted patents, one in the U.S., and another 18 patent filings currently under review.

    Financial details of the agreement with Nycomed have not been released, but the latter says its own Nycomed China operation and Techpool will be run as separate companies that interact through alliances. The firms aim to expand their presence in China, and focus on the ulinastatin, kiallikrein, Pantoloc®, Ebrantil®, and Actovegin® brands.



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