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Nov 19, 2012

NTRC Forges Drug Discovery Services Partnership with Carna

  • Netherlands Translational Research Center (NTRC) and Carna Biosciences, located in Japan, joined forces in the commercialization and marketing of their drug discovery services to the pharmaceutical industry.

    NTRC will offer the kinase assay profiling services of Carna to its customers in Europe. This service tests small molecule compounds on 311 biochemical kinase enzyme activity assays. In addition, NTRC will be the exclusive provider of Carna’s reverse phase protein array (RPPA) service in Europe. RPPA involves the analysis of the phosphorylation status of 180 disease-relevant proteins using a microarray technology and phospho-protein specific antibodies.

    Carna will offer the chemical biology and cancer cell line profiling services of NTRC to customers in Japan on an exclusive basis. NTRC says its cancer cell lines, Oncolines, represent the most frequent genetic aberrations in cancer. The panel of cell lines allows a quick scan of the most suitable genetic background for proof-of-concept studies.

    This is the second kinase deal NTRC has struck in the past week. The first agreement was with Merck & Co., under which NTRC obtained a worldwide exclusive license from Merck to develop and commercialize a series of investigational, preclinical protein kinase inhibitor candidates.


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