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Nov 12, 2012

New Distributor for Illumina's qPCR Portfolio

  • VWR International, a Radnor, Pennsylvania-based global distributor of laboratory supplies and services, will distribute Illumina's qPCR portfolio including the Eco™ real-time PCR system and NuPCR™ reagents within the U.S. According to Illumina, the agreement will extend the company's reach for its Eco system and NuPCR probe-based technology into thousands of laboratories and facilities nationwide.

    "Complementing Illumina's commercialization efforts with VWR's team of sales and services representatives enables us to significantly expand promotion and support of both the Eco System and NuPCR reagents in molecular biology laboratories throughout the United States," said Mark Lewis, svp and general manager of Illumina's molecular biology and PCR business. "We are very excited to join forces with VWR to accelerate adoption of our qPCR portfolio, particularly into the pharmaceutical and industrial markets where VWR has a strong presence."

    Illumina's Eco real-time PCR system is a compact instrument that allows researchers to perform any qPCR application directly on their bench top and is an alternative to traditional large, expensive PCR instruments. The company's NuPCR probe-based qPCR technology is designed to show specificity and sensitivity to complex gene targets. Customer orders for Illumina's qPCR portfolio through VWR will be accepted starting December 1, 2012.

    Earlier this month VWR acquired Lab3, a distributor of scientific laboratory supplies headquartered in Bristol, U.K. It also acquired Sovereign Group, a distributor of lab products with distribution centers and sales organizations in Brazil and Argentina, back in September.



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