GEN Exclusives

More »

GEN News Highlights

More »
Apr 30, 2007

Lumera Extends Deal with MUSC Related to Diagnostic Tests

  • Lumera and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) are continuing to investigate biomarkers for drug effects and disease.

    Lumera and MUSC researchers intend to develop an antibody array that will measure the levels and modifications of patient’s mitochondrial proteins. The company retains rights to commercialize all jointly developed intellectual property.

    "Changes in mitochondrial proteins are known to be markers for certain pathologies and many adverse drug effects," states Craig Beeson, Ph.D., associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences at MUSC and the principle investigator on this project. “The high-throughput and label-free nature of Lumera's platform enables us to develop an assay that will have significant time and cost advantages over existing technologies.

    Additionally, MUSC is also looking for new biomarkers. "Professor Beeson's applications along with projects in development at our two other academic beta sites are in the category of biomarker discovery," points out Ron Dudek, Lumera's director of business development. “In particular, these early adopters of our technology are interested in measuring the up- and down-regulation of thousands of proteins as a result of disease, stress, or drug therapy. Lumera's ProteomicProcessor™ instrument system and NanoCapture™ microarray slides enable the measurement of thousands of proteins simultaneously, thereby dramatically increasing the efficiency of the biomarker discovery process.”



Jobs

GEN Jobs powered by HireLifeScience.com connects you directly to employers in pharma, biotech, and the life sciences. View 40 to 50 fresh job postings daily or search for employment opportunities including those in R&D, clinical research, QA/QC, biomanufacturing, and regulatory affairs.
 Searching...

Unable to get Jobs Listings.

More »

GEN Poll

More » Poll Results »

Lab-Grown Vaginas

Which body part do you think will be successfully engineered in the lab next?