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Jul 10, 2012

Janssen Commits $5.4M to Multiple Sclerosis Initiative

  • Janssen Research & Development has pledged $5.4 million for a research initiative that aims to generate new insights into the genetic and biological causes of multiple sclerosis, and ultimately speed the development of new biomarkers, targets, and drugs. Under the research sponsorship, the Marin Community Foundation’s (MCF) Multiple Sclerosis Project Fund will establish a network of collaborating public and private research organizations to facilitate data sharing and the integration of scientific research results using computer-based modelling tools and analytics.

    Janssen says the initiative expands its Healthy Minds program, launched last year, which aims to speed the development of treatment of neurologic and brain disorders by encouraging collaboration between biotech, pharma, and public sector organizations. “The commitment of new funds under our Healthy Minds program to this research effort in MS builds on the longstanding Janssen tradition of advancing neuroscience research and commitment to innovative collaboration,” states Husseini K. Manji, M.D., global therapeutic area head for neuroscience at Janssen R&D.

    “Our aim is to bring together researchers and data to foster the development of new, transformational medicines and treatment paradigms to solve mysteries of the brain and central nervous system.” 


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