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Jun 16, 2010

Helicon to Exploit Sapient’s Structural Biology Expertise to Expedite Lead Design

  • Helicon Therapeutics is tapping into Sapient Discovery’s structural biology expertise to unravel the 3-D structures of specific drug targets. Through the collaboration, the firm will provide Helicon with a complete array of x-ray crystallography and modeling services including cloning, expression, protein purification, and co-crystal structure determination.

    Helicon is focused on the discovery of therapeutics to treat disorders of cognition through an understanding of the genetic basis of long-term memory formation. The firm says that structural data obtained from Sapient will help expedite structure-based lead design and optimization.

    Sapient Discovery is exploiting its structural design expertise, large-scale structural databases, and leading-edge computational methodologies to help its partners accelerate the drug discovery and drug optimization processes.

    In addition to structure determination services the company has developed its Genes To Leads™ service for accelerating lead discovery and target validation as well as the Fragments to Leads™ platform for generating novel lead molecules with x-ray crystallography and fragment libraries. StructureBank™ is a database for the large-scale comparative analysis of protein targets and antitargets.


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