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Jul 9, 2014

Genetic Variant Linked to Radiation-Induced Toxicity in Cancer Therapy

Genetic Variant Linked to Radiation-Induced Toxicity in Cancer Therapy

Source: © Alex Tihonov - Fotolia.com

  • Scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, along with colleagues in the U.K. and Spain, report they discovered that key genetic variants may affect how cancer patients respond to radiation treatments. The research team found that variations in the TANC1 gene are associated with a greater risk for radiation-driven side effects in prostate cancer patients, which include incontinence, impotence, and diarrhea.

    The current results are based on a genome-wide association study (“A three-stage genome-wide association study identifies a susceptibility locus for late radiotherapy toxicity at 2q24.1”) published in Nature Genetics.

    “Our findings, which were replicated in two additional patient groups, represent a significant step toward developing personalized treatment plans for prostate cancer patients,” said Barry S. Rosenstein, Ph.D., professor, radiation oncology, genetics and genomic sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “Within five years, through the use of a predictive genomic test that will be created using the data obtained in the recent study, it may be possible to optimize treatment for a large number of cancer patients.”

    For the study, Dr. Rosenstein and his team obtained blood samples from nearly 400 patients who were receiving radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer. The blood samples were screened for roughly one million genetic markers, and each patient was monitored for at least two years to track incidents of side effects from the radiation. Data analysis showed which genetic markers were consistently associated with the development of complications following radiotherapy.

    “[Our] results, together with the role of TANC1 in regenerating damaged muscle, suggest that the TANC1 locus influences the development of late radiation-induced damage,” wrote the investigators.

    “The next step is to validate the results, and see if the same markers predict similar outcomes in patients with other forms of cancer,” explained Dr. Rosenstein. Using the genomic test being developed, treatment plans can be adjusted to minimize adverse effects thereby allowing for an improved quality life for many cancer survivors.


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