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Feb 26, 2014

G3 Secures Another Partner for Cardiovascular-Focused Study

  • One week after announcing a collaboration with Quintiles, Global Genomics Group (G3) has secured another partner for its GLOBAL study. Caprion Proteomics has been tapped to identify blood-based protein markers for the GLOBAL (Genetic LOci and Burden of Atherosclerotic Lesions) study.

    Caprion will utilize its CellCarta® technology, which is composed of sample preparation, mass spectrometry, bioinformatics, and biological expertise, to analyze and measure differential expression of proteins in plasma samples from the patients enrolled in GLOBAL. The ability to monitor and quantify large numbers of proteins in complex samples is key to understanding and treating complex diseases such as cardiovascular disease.

    "We will analyze 22 trillion data points from the precise CT phenotyping and the pan-omic analyses with specifically developed systems and biology-based bioinformatics, allowing us to understand the root causes of cardiovascular disease and ultimately enable us to identify novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets,” Szilard Voros, M.D., CEO and co-founder of G3, explained. “Caprion’s unbiased and targeted mass spectrometry-based proteomic platform will provide an in-depth assessment of plasma proteins to complement the other 'omic' approaches we are using in the GLOBAL study.”

    According to G3, GLOBAL is the largest pan-omic study combining genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, and lipoprotein proteomics with coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiography, an advanced imaging technology for phenotyping, which allows precise disease classification of patients.



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