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May 2, 2011

Dyadic Inks Vaccine Research Deal with Sanofi Pasteur and EnGen Bio

  • Dyadic, Sanofi Pasteur, and EnGen Bio are partnering on research work for vaccines. Under the agreement, Sanofi Pasteur will fund collaborative activities at Dyadic Nederland's R&D facility in Wageningen, The Netherlands.

    Research will utilize Dyadic's C1 fungus platform for certain vaccine applications. The research is anticipated to be completed in 6 to 12 months. It will be conducted under the guidance and direction of Dyadic Nederland's GM, Dr. ir. Wim van der Wilden, with coordination by Mark Alfenito, Ph.D., president and CEO of EnGen Bio.

    EnGen Bio is working to develop biopharmaceutical applications for Dyadic's C1 platform. The technology consists of two parts: the C1 fungal high-throughput robotic screening system and the C1 Express hyperproducing protein-expression system.

    Dyadic’s scientists developed strains of the fungal microorganism Chrysosporium lucknowense (C1) to rapidly discover and express both eukaryotic and prokaryotic genes and to manufacture the novel products of those genes, using C1 as the host organism from beginning to end. By utilizing a single organism for all steps of the process, Dyadic says that its integrated platform eliminates many of the bottlenecks inherent with other technologies currently used to bring gene products to market.


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