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Apr 22, 2010

CRT and University of Auckland Team Up to Develop Leukemia Treatments

  • University of Auckland and Cancer Research UK’s commercialization arm, Cancer Research Technology (CRT), inked a partnership focused on the development of new targeted treatments for leukemia. The research will focus on an enzyme reportedly linked to the growth and development of leukemia cells.

    The enzyme was originally discovered by scientists at the University of Birmingham. A collaboration between the Birmingham researchers and Cancer Research Technology’s discovery laboratories subsequently led to the identification of a series of compounds on which CRT and the University of Auckland’s drug discovery team will focus.

    “Growing evidence is showing that targeting this important enzyme has the potential to lead us to new treatments for leukemia and potentially other cancers,” comments Professor Bill Denny, Ph.D., co-director of the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, School of Medicine. “The first step will be to generate improved compounds, which could ultimately move into preclinical development”.

    Under the terms of the deal CRT retains exclusive rights to commercialize any resulting IP. Work at the University of Auckland will be supported by a preseed investment from its commercialization and knowledge transfer arm, Auckland UniServices.


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