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Aug 20, 2012

CHDI Taps Proteome for Huntington's Biomarker Expertise

  • CHDI Foundation is tapping Proteome Sciences for biomarker discovery expertise to help progress its research into Huntington’s disease pathology. Initially, Proteome will carry out PS Biomarker Services™ for CHDI to complement the organization’s research programs. The work will be undertaken at Proteome’s facility at Frankfurt am Main in Germany.

    “We are delighted that CHDI has selected PS Biomarker Services to deliver potential proteomic markers that could help elucidate mechanisms of Huntington’s disease pathology," remarks Ian Pike, Ph.D., Proteome’s COO. “The link between the Huntington’s disease genotype and disease phenotype remains poorly understood, and we will apply our tandem mass tag workflows to provide high-density protein expression maps in cell lines carrying different CAG-repeat lengths.”

    Proteome Sciences offers dedicated biomarker services, biomarker assays, isobaric and isotopic reagents, and proprietary biomarkers. The firm’s PS Biomarkers Service includes separate modules for the discovery, validation, and measurement of biomarkers, based on the use of isobaric and isotopic Tandem Mass Tags® (TMT®), and both gel-based and gel-free separation technologies and mass spectrometry. The PS Biomarkers Service is complemented by a PS Biomarker Discovery™ Consulting Service through which Proteome offers access to custom assay development options for a range of disease model and human sample types.

    With specialist knowledge in the fields of nervous system disorders, oncology, and stroke, the firm’s expertise is well-geared to Huntington’s disease research. “Proteome Sciences has previously performed studies to identify biomarkers of Huntington’s disease progression in blood, and several of these are being evaluated as potential pharmacodynamic markers,” Dr. Pike states.



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