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Mar 30, 2012

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences Takes Over Blue Ocean Biomedical

  • Beckman Coulter Life Sciences has acquired Blue Ocean Biomedical, a manufacturer of automated flow cytometry systems and reagents. The transaction provides Beckman Coulter Life Sciences with low complexity analyzers that integrate automated sample preparation and directly address emerging flow cytometry market trends. The systems and reagents are currently not available in the U.S. but available for distribution in the EU only.

    Blue Ocean Biomedical products complement the company’s cytometry portfolio with instruments based on a “sample in, result out” (SIRO) approach that represents a fundamental change in the routine clinical analysis sector. Blue Ocean Biomedical products provide integration of sample preparation, handling, analysis, and data management—reportedly the only SIRO solution for clinical flow cytometry.

    “Our team has developed a line of truly unique instrument systems: essentially, the world’s first ‘load & go’ flow cytometers,” comments Mike Brochu, CEO and co-founder of Blue Ocean Biomedical. “With its history of leadership and innovation in this field, Beckman Coulter has all the resources and technology needed to build on this platform and future systems for years to come.”

    Scott Atkin, president, Beckman Coulter Life Sciences, notes, “This acquisition provides both immediate opportunity and long-term value. The simplification of customer workflows will be dramatic. We’ll be able to offer customers an extended line of market-leading technology while expanding our reach within a key segment for flow cytometry.” Beckman Coulter Life Sciences expects to be able to deliver an expanded clinical testing portfolio to a broader global market.



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