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Feb 01, 2012 (Vol. 32, No. 3)

VideoScience

URL:bit.ly/aNyJ8C
  • Substantial video collection
  • Some episode descriptions are limited
Platform: iPad/iPhone  
Cost: Free

I am all for anything “designed to inspire and excite kids of all ages,” so VideoScience is right up my alley (and it should be up your alley, too). This app currently contains approximately 80 videos, and the episode list continues to grow. Each episode depicts a science demonstration, many of which use items that can be found at your nearby grocery or hardware store. The videos are hosted by science teacher Dan Menelly, who nicely explains the concepts behind each demonstration, as well as general considerations when performing the experiments yourself. As an example, episodes include those entitled “Pyrolysis: Sugar on Fire!” and “Spacesuit Simulator.” The interface of the app presents a small thumbnail of the video and an accompanying description, set against a lab notebook backdrop. When selected, the video opens to fullscreen.

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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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