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Nov 15, 2007 (Vol. 27, No. 20)

The Arrowsmith Project Homepage

URL:arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/index.html
  • Exellent coverage
  • Mainly for nerds
The Arrowsmith Project represents a targeted effort to provide sorted/filtered information relevant to scientific references. There are in fact tools on the site that allow researchers to go far “beneath the skin” of ordinary reference information, permitting the extraction of new information by data mining. How, you might wonder, does Arrowsmith accomplish this? A fair question. It starts with a tool called Arrowsmith that attempts to identify links between two different articles using words/phrases common in their titles. A second tool called Author-ity aims to identify Medline articles written by a single author (under construction at press time). Other interesting features of the site include WetLab, an open-source electronic lab notebook (surprisingly, for Windows only); ADAM (Another Database of Abbreviations in MEDLINE); and links to other biomining text tools. Though it is aimed mainly at nerds, Arrowsmith appears to have a stranglehold on the field of scientific reference analysis/retrieval.
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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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