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May 15, 2006 (Vol. 26, No. 10)

Sloan Science Cinemateque

URL:www.movingimage.us/science
  • Captivating quality
  • Nothing significant
Describing itself as the Museum of the Moving Image and as "a forum for short films, interviews, and articles that enhance the public understanding of science and technology," Sloan Science Cinemateque gets two thumbs up for the well-done streaming videos available at the site. I scoped out the first one—The Disappearance of Andy Waxman—just as a curiosity and found it totally captivating. 24 minutes later, I’d gained a fascinating perspective about the importance of short-term memory in a way that I never could have gotten from a textbook. The quality of the videos is excellent, though even on a cable modem, I did find that things ground to a halt occasionally. One of the more intriguing science-related sites I’ve ever seen.
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  • Weak Points
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  • Good


*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

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