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Oct 15, 2013 (Vol. 33, No. 18)

Ribosomal Mutation Database

URL:ribosome.fandm.edu
  • Clearly states phenotypes and citations
  • Form view displays just one result per page

What happens when single nucleotides within the sequences encoding ribosomal RNAs are mutated? That is the question addressed by the Ribosomal Mutation Database curated by faculty at Franklin & Marshall College. This database houses just over 1,000 records for ribosomal RNA mutations, supplying a brief description of the resulting phenotypes and the primary citations. The records are primarily from E. coli, with only fewer than 100 records hailing from other organisms. Database users can display the information in either table view (which displays 10 records per page, apparently sorted by base position at which the mutation occurs) or form view. The latter view displays only one entry per page, which makes it quite inconvenient to browse. (As users can filter the results by position, alteration, organism, etc. in either view, the form view seems unnecessary.)

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  • Weak Points
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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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