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Oct 01, 2009 (Vol. 29, No. 17)

Plant and Insect Parasitic Nematodes

URL:nematode.unl.edu
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This cleanly designed, well-organized website through the University of Nebraska-Lincoln just makes me happy. (An odd reaction, perhaps, to a webpage about parasitic worm.) One cannot help but get excited about nematodes—microscopic worms—after reading the various species descriptions and perusing through the scanning electron microscope images.  There are resources that address how to identify nematodes as well as pages organized by habitat. (Have you ever stopped to consider the ways in which nematodes of the tropical rainforest might differ from nematodes of the prairie?) On a lighter note, one of my favorite sections of the site is the “Imaginemas” page, which features “Nematodes from the fertile fields of our imagination.” In total, this website itself is fertile with nematode resources, and its nice organization will make any web-surfer jump with joy.

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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

Do you agree that ecstasy should be studied for its potential therapeutic benefits?

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