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Jan 15, 2005 (Vol. 25, No. 2)

Oncomine: Cancer Microarray Database

URL:141.214.6.50/oncomine/main/index.jsp
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Speaking of information access, consider the challenges of organizing content faced by microarray database designers. First, the amount of information on microarrays can be enormous. Second, each sequence on a microarray has relationships to genomic information about which there are dozens of outstanding databases, each with their own format. An ideal microarray database sits in the middle of all these materials and points researchers to interconnected links as easily and seamlessly as possible. I'm Happy to report that Oncomine is one such database. While it is possible to get a bit "overextended" following database links from the microarray information , one has to marvel at how well interconnected the data is and how easily one can navigate through/to it.
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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

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