Leading the Way in Life Science Technologies

GEN Exclusives

More »

Best of the Web

More »
Jun 15, 2005 (Vol. 25, No. 12)

Nematode Net

URL:www.nematode.net/index.php
  • Well organized
  • None
If you thought mega-sequencing for simpler organisms was going to stop once the human, mouse, and rat genome sequences were complete, think again. Nematode Net has the ambitious goal of sequencing 315,000 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from 30 parasitic nematode species. Gulp. For those of us who remember the days before there were 315,000 bases sequenced in total, the scale of this project is remarkable. What's even more impressive is that it is only a moderately sized effort by modern standards. It's not an unimportant one, however, as nematodes are major human health hazards. A click on a few of the species names will reveal the billions of people affected by them. Organization of the information is great-easy to navigate with pull down menu links from the top of the page and a panel of hyperlinks on the side. Check out the pictures that range from scary/ugly to beautiful.
  • Key:
  • Strong Points
  • Weak Points
  • Ratings:
  • Excellent
  • Very Good
  • Good


*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

Be sure to take the GEN Poll

Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

Do you agree that ecstasy should be studied for its potential therapeutic benefits?

More »