GEN Exclusives

More »

Best of the Web

More »
Aug 01, 2009 (Vol. 29, No. 14)

Myrmecos.net

URL:www.myrmecos.net/index.html
  • High-quality photos
  • No scientific information about the various species

I always love to take the opportunity to expand my knowledge of the scientific vernacular. (Why say “the study of fungi” when you can say “mycology”?) Well, your word for the day is “myrmecology,” the scientific study of ants. A nice place to explore the beautiful world of our six-legged companions is Myrmecos.net, a photography site by Alex Wild. Other types of insects are included, though the page clearly has an ant bias. (The photograph categories are “ants” and “not ants.”) Images can be viewed either taxonomically, or they can be sorted according to behavior/life history. There are desktop wallpapers available (if you would really care to stare into the eyes of a wasp all day), and there is also a nice list of links to other ant pages. I did find it odd, though, that although the photographer “strongly encourages” educational, scientific, and noncommercial uses of his photos, he delineates a number of conditions that must be met in order for one to do so, including contacting him to obtain permission prior to using any of the images.

  • Key:
  • Strong Points
  • Weak Points
  • Ratings:
  • Excellent
  • Very Good
  • Good

*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

Jobs

GEN Jobs powered by HireLifeScience.com connects you directly to employers in pharma, biotech, and the life sciences. View 40 to 50 fresh job postings daily or search for employment opportunities including those in R&D, clinical research, QA/QC, biomanufacturing, and regulatory affairs.
 Searching...

Unable to get Jobs Listings.

More »

GEN Poll

More » Poll Results »

Biosimilars

Compared to the original biologics, do you think biosimilars run the risks of being less effective and causing more side effects?