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Feb 15, 2008 (Vol. 28, No. 4)

Mammalian Protein Localization Database

URL:locate.imb.uq.edu.au
  • Superb organization
  • None
Whither goest thou, protein? To yonder mitochondria? And what controls thy path dear friend? Sequence phantasmagoria? The march of proteins through the cell to their proper organellar destinations is essential for cellular life and is the subject of this informative Web site. Hosted by the Institute of Molecular Bioscience at the University of Queensland, the database wins high marks for superb organization. On the right site of the opening page are listed 38 distinct cellular localization sites. Beside these are numbers for mouse and human proteins, respectively, known to exist in each location. Clicking on a number brings up the entire list of proteins for that organism. Access doesn’t get much simpler (or better) than this. As search engine also provide database-wide searching functions. An excellent idea, well implemented.
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  • Strong Points
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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

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