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Jun 15, 2005 (Vol. 25, No. 12)

Interactive Guide to Diffraction

URL:www.uni-wuerzburg.de/mineralogie/crystal/teaching/teaching.html
  • Strong Points: Simulations
  • Very techie
X-ray diffraction measurements provide important information for determining molecular structure. Interpreting this information is the province of physicists and biophysicists, not something that one takes up lightly. In an attempt to help people to better understand diffraction, Th. Proffen and R.B. Neder have put together a tutorial on the subject complete with well-written text, informative figures, and interactive simulations. Indeed, the Interactive Guide to Diffraction is very appropriately named, with informative simulations oozing through all of its cracks. You’ll have to know a bit about the subject of diffraction to get much out of the site, but if you are knowledgeable on the subject, you’ll find a lot to like in this little gem as you brush up.
  • Key:
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  • Weak Points
  • Ratings:
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  • Good


*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

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