GEN Exclusives

More »

Best of the Web

More »
Apr 15, 2005 (Vol. 25, No. 8)

Feline Research Program

URL:www.ckwri.tamuk.edu/feline/default.asp
  • Interesting reading
  • Narrow audience
I’m not a cat person. I don’t like house pets that don’t come when they’re called and I am concerned about diseases spread by human-animal contact when living together in close quarters. With the rise here in Oregon of the cougar population in the wild, I have even more reasons not to like this collection of predators. Nevertheless, I can say a big hurrah for the Feline Research Program’s informative pages. Hosted at Texas A&M University, the Feline Research Program contains page after page of well-written informative descriptions of research on seven felid species (mostly in southern Texas). Animals include bobcats, mountain lions, leopards, ocelots, clouded leopards, and Asiatic golden cats. Complete with pictures and a section on molecular genetics, this is an informative site on a topic you don’t hear much about.
  • Key:
  • Strong Points
  • Weak Points
  • Ratings:
  • Excellent
  • Very Good
  • Good

*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

Jobs

GEN Jobs powered by HireLifeScience.com connects you directly to employers in pharma, biotech, and the life sciences. View 40 to 50 fresh job postings daily or search for employment opportunities including those in R&D, clinical research, QA/QC, biomanufacturing, and regulatory affairs.
 Searching...
More »

Be sure to take the GEN Poll

The Triple Package and Success

One theory for explaining “success," put forward by Amy Chua Jed Rubenfeld, posits cultural traits such as a superiority complex, personal insecurity and impulse control. Union College professors Joshua Hart and Christopher Chabris counter that intelligence, conscientiousness, and economic advantage are the most likely elements of success, regardless of ethnicity. Do you think that Hart-Chabris make a better argument for achieving success than the Chua-Rubenfeld theory?

More »