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Jul 01, 2011 (Vol. 31, No. 13)

External Scientific Toolkit at the Rockefeller University

URL:cs.rockefeller.edu/index.php3?page=toolkit
  • Diversity in resources
  • Nothing major

A website certainly doesn’t always need bells and whistles in order to be a great resource. Take, for instance, the “external scientific toolkit” page through the information technology office of The Rockefeller University. Simple and succinct, this single page is like a molecular Swiss Army Knife—sure it’s small, but it’s pretty darn handy. Within this “toolkit” is a list of links to a variety of data analysis (or just generally useful) resources. The links are grouped into 23 categories. As but a small sample, some of these categories are: alignment editing, biochemistry, gene prediction, organism databases, protein 3-D structure, and RNAi. So the next time you find yourself in need of a tried-and-true online resource to, say, analyze RNA secondary structure, there’s no toolkit with faster or easier access than this one.

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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

Do you agree that ecstasy should be studied for its potential therapeutic benefits?

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