Leading the Way in Life Science Technologies

GEN Exclusives

More »

Best of the Web

More »
Dec 01, 2006 (Vol. 26, No. 21)

DBTGR - Database of Tunicate Gene Regulation

URL:dbtgr.hgc.jp
  • Useful for researchers
  • Narrow focus
I don’t mean to get personal, but when was the last time you thought hard about the tunicates? To refresh your memory, tunicates are a group of animals that include the sedentary ascidians (sea squirts). These are also animals with appearances only a mother sea squirt might love. Ah, but beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so if you are a researcher of these organisms, you might see them differently from me. Irrespective of how you view these little guys, you’ve got to give a lot of credit to the Human Genome Center in Tokyo for hosting this unusual database, which contains descriptions of 12 transcription factors and 140 promoters. While this might be small enough to not require a search engine, the site nevertheless has one, providing presumably for the day when it expands to accommodate the growing body of sea squirt knowledge.
  • Key:
  • Strong Points
  • Weak Points
  • Ratings:
  • Excellent
  • Very Good
  • Good


*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

Be sure to take the GEN Poll

Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

Do you agree that ecstasy should be studied for its potential therapeutic benefits?

More »