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Apr 01, 2005 (Vol. 25, No. 7)

DBSubloc - INTRO

URL:www.bioinfo.tsinghua.edu.cn/dbsubloc.html
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To the outside observer, the inside organization of a eukaryotic cell is chaotic. DNA makes RNA in the nucleus, which gets spliced, capped, polyadenylated, and then moved to the cytoplasm where translation occurs and then the proteins made there travel to organelles based on signal sequences they contain (as best we know). How everything makes it to its proper place is still an active area of investigation. Providing information on the process is the aim of the DBSubLoc database (Database of Protein Subcellular Localization). At the site, visitors can search the database, upload sequences for prediction of subcellular localization of the protein made from the sequence, download information from the database, and BLAST sequences in selected taxonomic classifications. A useful research database on an interesting topic.
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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

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