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May 15, 2012 (Vol. 32, No. 10)

DAVID

URL:david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov
  • Many tutorials, easy to navigate site
  • Nothing major

Congratulations, you’ve just completed your first genome-scale gene-expression analysis. You are holding in your hand the (very) long resulting list of genes. Now what? What does it all mean? Time to ask DAVID for help. DAVID—the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery—is a free online suite of analysis tools hosted by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the NIH. Users enter a list of genes and sequentially apply DAVID tools to that list. Tools include a functional annotation tool, a gene functional classifier, a gene ID converter, a gene name batch viewer, and a NIAID pathogen annotation browser. The website includes a number of help resources to get researchers started, including an introductory PowerPoint presentation and a link to a recently published protocol paper detailing step-by-step instructions on how to use DAVID to analyze lists of genes.

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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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