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May 01, 2006 (Vol. 26, No. 9)

ChemMine-search

URL:bioweb.ucr.edu/ChemMine/search.php?opt=2
  • Massive database
  • Few descriptions of content
You've got to admire the aspirations of this interesting site—to facilitate chemical genomics screens and disseminate the generated knowledge. Hosted at the Center for Plant Cell Biology at the University of California, Riverside, the focus would seem to be on plants but it really isn't. The size of the database is impressive—over 2,000,000 compounds at press time. Users can search the ChemMine database and upload compounds, as well. Online analysis tools provide functions for structure-based clustering of compounds and numerous viewing and formatting functions. The entire project is open source, so as to provide maximum access to information. There's a lot to like here, but like other database-focused sites, a bit of background would be helpful.
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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

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