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Jul 01, 2005 (Vol. 25, No. 13)

Berkeley PGA

URL:pga.lbl.gov
  • Organization, online tools
  • Nothing significant
Speaking of cardiovascular research, the obliquely titled Berkeley PGA is a welcome site for this subject. Offering on its opening page the most extensive set of freely available software tools for sequence analysis of any of the Programs for Genomic Applications (PGA), Berkeley PGA is an outstanding example of online resources. Perhaps the best example of this is the question posted at the top of the opening page, "Do You Need Your BACs (Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes) Sequenced?" Then, if that was not enough, they announce a program to sequence said clones. The software tools are easy to access and include VISTA (comparative analysis of genomic sequences), CVCGD (database of cardiovascular genes), and SEARCH (a tool for scanning information at all PGA sites). In addition, other sections of the site deal with protocols, education, researchers, and other data. Berkeley PGA is the best of the PGA sites.
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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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