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Dec 01, 2013 (Vol. 33, No. 21)

BeeBase

URL:hymenopteragenome.org/beebase
  • Nice organization, many genomic sequences
  • Nothing major

I have no doubt that researchers will “bee” having a great time on BeeBase, an excellent website for the bee scientific community. On this site one will find genomic sequences galore—in addition to the more common Apis mellifera genome, the site also hosts the genomes for three mellifera pathogens as well as for two other bee species (Bombus terrestris and Bombus impatiens). Additionally, two other species’ genomes will be incorporated soon. The “tools” section of the site includes genome browsers and BLAST resources, while the “Beebase wiki” page provides site visitors with not only an introduction to the site, but also an interactive resource for the bee research community. Wiki users can post to the discussion board, share research materials, and provide gene annotation data.

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*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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Scientifically Studying Ecstasy

MDMA (commonly known as the empathogen “ecstasy”) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, which is reserved for compounds with no accepted medical use and a high abuse potential. Two researchers from Stanford, however, call for a rigorous scientific exploration of MDMA's effects to identify precisely how the drug works, the data from which could be used to develop therapeutic compounds.

Do you agree that ecstasy should be studied for its potential therapeutic benefits?

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