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Apr 15, 2007 (Vol. 27, No. 8)

AiO - All in One

URL:132.187.163.191/aio
  • Interesting software
  • Free? Or not free?
Most people who know me know what a Macintosh fanatic I am (and have been for the past 20+ years), so they may find it surprising for me to be recommending a downloadable software package that doesn’t run on a Mac. Actually, now that you can run Windows on a Mac, you can run virtually anything, including this program, on a Mac, but that’s another matter. The subject at hand, AiO, will run on flavors of Windows up to XP. The software appears to have been designed to handle oligos and grew from there. Today, the program encompasses many of the sequence searching routines and manipulations common to commercial sequence-analysis packages. The beauty here, though, is that it seems to be free, or at least there is no price posted. The download page leads to a description of the system requirements, but to get the program, one clicks a button that sends an e-mail to the author. Presumably, that gets it e-mailed to you. I didn’t jump through the hoops, so I can’t comment on the program’s functionality, but if the screenshots are any indication and the price truly is free, there is little to lose by checking it out.
  • Key:
  • Strong Points
  • Weak Points
  • Ratings:
  • Excellent
  • Very Good
  • Good

*The opinions expressed are solely those of the author(s) and should not be construed as reflecting the viewpoints of the publisher, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., the publishing house, or employees and affiliates thereof.

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